Using mouse inside Vim on Terminal.app

     When I am writing code, I spend most of my time inside Vim on Terminal.app on MacOS. When I am not writing code, I still end up spending a good bit of my time on Terminal.app, running all sorts of commands, using command-line applications (such as irssi for IRC), and editing files in Vim here and there.

     Coming from Linux, my biggest gripe with Vim on Terminal.app has been the fact that I could not scroll through the Vim window using the wheel on my mouse as I would any normal editor. If I tried to scroll up or down, Terminal.app would scroll through the Terminal session instead and mess everything up. For a long time, I had to contend myself with holding down the Fn and Shift keys and using the Up and Down arrows to scroll back and forth. Anyone who has done this can immediately imagine how annoying this can get.

     So, the other day I had a thought cross my mind and I asked myself, “Vim can’t really be that lame and not support the functionality of scrolling with the mouse properly. I am simply missing out on something.” I looked around, and sure enough, I found that Vim does support all sorts of mouse-related operations on the shell, including properly scrolling up and down. This particular feature of Vim is toggled via the “:set mouse=a” setting. You could go through the help menu, with “:help mouse” inside a Vim session, to see what other values, apart from “a”, that setting can take. But for all intents and purposes, the “a” setting is sufficient.

     I was happy Vim could do that. But, when I toggled it in Vim on Terminal.app, it didn’t work. Scrolling, as before, would only scroll through the Terminal.app buffer and mess up things. I was disappointed.

     Sifting through a couple more threads here and there on the web about Vim, scroll, and Terminal.app, I was able to figure out the reason why, after enabling mouse support on Vim, it didn’t work on Terminal.app. As it turns out, Terminal.app eats away all the mouse gestures thrown at it, and does not delegate them to Vim or other applications running within the shell. It doesn’t let them through. Vim wasn’t getting any mouse gestures at all. This was a problem. I thought I had bumped into a big, thick wall that could not be crossed.

     But, I was wrong. Luckily, I somehow managed to find a plugin, by the name of Mouse Term, for Terminal.app that patched Terminal.app’s behaviour of masking mouse gestures and not letting them through to individual applications. Mouse Term, as is mentioned on its home page, requires another, small application, SIMBL, to be installed first to work. In fact, Mouse Term is a SIMBL plugin.

     Once I had SIMBL and then Mouse Term installed and Terminal.app loaded, I could actually scroll through Vim, with the “:set mouse=a” setting, prefectly. Not only that, I noticed something else as well that made me so happy. I use tabs in Vim. Vim makes available half a dozen Vim commands, that start with the prefex “:tab”, to manipulate tabs, navigate through them, etc. If you’ve ever used tabs seriously on Vim, and used these commands to cycle through tabs, for example, you’d understand how frustrating it can get. But, guess what my excitement was about? Not only could I now scroll through a Vim window smoothly, I could also click on the tabs to switch to them. I could also click on the “X” on the top right corner to close a tab. It simply worked.

     The best part is when you have the NERD Tree Vim plugin installed. You can, inside the NERD Tree window, expand and collapse directories and open files simply at the click or double click of the mouse. As a Vim user, what more could you want?

CoreText rendering on MacVim

On thakis’s unprecedented reply to my tweet about hating the fact of MacVim not having the same style of font rendering and background combination as does Terminal, I got to know that the latest snapshot of MacVim supports an experimental ‘CoreText’ rendering feature. I immediately downloaded the snapshot, and was happy to find that ‘CoreText’ rendering takes care of my biggest pet peeve with MacVim. Now, with a dark background, the default ‘macvim’ colour scheme, and with transparency set to a count of 5, I am ecstatic with what I see as being rendered by MacVim.

I have to say, I am smitten with it. For what it is worth, here are the relevant Vim settings:

set guifont=Monaco:h11.00
colorscheme macvim
set background=dark
set transparency=5

Oh, and, if you get around to trying it out, don’t forget to enable ‘experimental rendering’ feature from within the ‘Advanced’ tabs in the preferences pane for MacVim.