iPad mini retina image retention

I first read about image retention on iPad mini retina on Marco Arment’s blog. His iPad mini retina had a slight case of image retention which he discovered by [creating and] running an image retention test on his iPad. I used the word slight to describe Marco’s case because his was a minor problem, something had he not run the test explicitly would not have noticed during normal use. Because it didn’t seem something that would get in the way of enjoying the beautiful screen of the new iPad mini, I didn’t give it much thought.

The very first thing, after hooking it up online, I did on my new iPad mini retina was run Marco’s image retention test. It passed, which elated me and squashed what little fears I had. In hindsight I forgot to run the test for ten minutes, hastily choosing a minute instead. I basked in the magnificence of the retina screen and the weightlessness of the device for two whole weeks. It was the perfect tablet: light-weight, just the right size, with a beautifully sharp and crisp screen, a lot of computing power packed inside a small form factor, and a lovely OS to make it all work seamlessly. Then, one unfortunate night after work when I pulled out the iPad from inside the drawer I keep it in when away, I was dreadfully shocked to look at the mess the screen had become. The image retention clearly visible on the screen was horrible. There were crooked lines everywhere, and swiping on the screen caused them to flicker grotesquely. If Marco saw it, he would jump up his chair.

Home screen on my iPad mini with severe image retention.

Home screen on my iPad mini with severe image retention.

I managed to get the iPad returned to Apple. To my surprise, and a little disappointment, Apple outright refunded me the device.

Macro in his post explained why he thought the issue was there. Apple buys retina panels from a couple of manufacturers. Panels from at least one manufacturer exhibit image retention. I think Apple is fully aware of it, and it’s the reason why iPad mini with retina displays are in short supply.

I loved that thing. I cannot emphasise that enough. I will buy it again, when the next batch from manufacturing hits the market.

iPad 2 WiFi greyed-out (N/A)

I purchased an Apple iPad 2 over half an year ago. I bought a Rilakkuma smart cover with it. The iPad was tugged inside the cover in the shop, and I never felt the need to take it out since. However yesterday the iPad gave me a scare.

It had been rather hot and humid the past couple of days, more humid than hot. Despite the temperature being around the 35-36C bracket, it felt as though it was actually over 40C. I had been using the iPad as a content consumption device heavily, but of late, I had only been reading books on it, thus keeping the WiFi disabled. Yesterday, however, I had issues with the WiFi scanning for networks. It couldn’t find any. I had given the problem to some rogue setting on the WiFi router (the WiFi, alledgedly, on iPad is sensitive to WiFi routers). But today, to my utter shock, I found the WiFi option under Settings disabled (greyed-out). What shocked me more was finding “N/A” listed next to WiFi under Settings > About, which meant that the OS didn’t find any WiFi chip/interface on the iPad.

That freaked me out. My first assumption was the WiFi chip had died. Reading a couple of posts on forums about the issue (there weren’t many covering the issue) confirmed that. However, someone suggested cooling down the iPad before powering it on again. Since I had already assumed the worst, I thought it wouldn’t hurt if I tried that suggestion.

I took the iPad out of its cover for the first time since purchasing it. I turned on the airco, powered off the iPad, and left it directly under the airco to let it cool off. After around twenty minutes, when the Aluminium backside of the iPad felt chilled to the touch, I crossed my fingers, and powered it on. Voila! The WiFi option was no longer greyed-out, and the Settings > About no longer showed a frightening N/A.

I heaved a deep sigh of relief.

I am lost as to the exact cause of the problem. I do know that high humidity (coupled with heat) plays havoc with electronics. And the iPad had been left around in closed, hot rooms every now and then (with other electronics, I must point out). Nevertheless, I’m glad it is working now.

Pakistan Summer Time, and NTP on OS X

     I noticed today that, after a major update to OS X along with a security update, the time on the system clock was an hour ahead. In fact, I didn’t pick it up until after I had glanced at the time on my cell phone. When I opened the preferences where different settings related to time and date can be set, I realised that the Network Time Protocol (NTP) had been enabled, which meant that the system was syncing time and date, along with the usual time zone information, from a remote network time server. In my case, that server was time.asia.apple.com, one of three servers in the drop-down list of NTP servers in the preferences to choose from.

     As with the other two, time.asia.apple.com is an NTP server that is managed by Apple themselves. If you travel a lot, or if you are mindful of and in a place where daylight savings time is commonplace, being able to use an NTP server to not worry about having to change time and date is ideal. It is convenient. After all, time is important, and keeping track of time more so.

     Now, I love NTP. It sure beats having to change time manually all the time. But, what if the NTP server you so dearly depend on suddenly starts spewing out incorrect time? Well, you’d eventually notice that, yes, but it would be annoying. The emails you send are suddenly ahead of time, the IM messages you receive as well, your calendar events, etc. If the difference in time due to the error is subtle, say, maybe off by an hour or so, you will likely take longer to spot it. Not that your house will burn down, or your business will plummet in a downward spiral into loss, but it sure will cause problems, even if little, annoying ones.

     So, why am I here on a hot Saturday afternoon with no mains power, talking about all this? Because I found out today that time.asia.apple.com is giving out a time for Pakistan that is +6 GMT, when it should correctly be +5 GMT. Judging from the label “Pakistan Summer Time” that the NTP server is using to describe the time, I can understand where this skew in time is creeping in from. But it is wrong. And the time on my system is wrong. What’s worse is that the place in system preferences where date and time settings are, does not provide an option for me to use a custom NTP server of my own choosing. I am restricted to choosing from the drop-down of three NTP servers, only one of which applies to my time zone. Bugger!

     Until I found /etc/ntp.conf This small text file stores the address of an NTP server to use. Regardless of whether you have NTP time enabled in the preferences pane, you will have an existing entry in the file. If you change the address in there to point to something, say, asia.pool.ntp.org, the system will use the new NTP server. In the preferences, the NTP server you added will automatically be selected for you, even though, if you pull the drop-down, you won’t notice it in the choices available.

     The only problem is, asia.pool.ntp.org also has Pakistan time pinned down at +6 GMT. Square one!

MacBook, OS X, some cool softwares, and happy me!

I have always dreamt of having a MacBook one day. Last week was nothing short of a dream coming true (much thanks to you know who you are). I got my first brand-new, shiny spanking white MacBook. It’s got a 2.1-GHz core 2 duo processor. I bumped up the RAM from the standard 1-GB to a whooping 4-GB. The screen is smaller than my Dell, about 13.1 inches. The entire laptop, in fact, is much smaller than the Dell. But doubtless it is nothing short of being a beauty. It is running the latest iteration of Mac OS X, Leopard, 10.5.5.

I wanted to mention some of the softwares I have downloaded and/or installed separately. Some of them are what I believe those that any first-time Mac user would want to have on their Mac. Do note that I’ve never earnestly used a Mac before, which pretty much makes me a first-time user.

IM

  • Adium Adium is a multi-protocol IM software for Mac. Being multi-protocol, it supports a two dozen different protocols. I use it mostly for MSN, Yahoo, and GTalk. The interface resembles very much, if you have used it, Pidgin. It is stable, and works very reliably.
  • Mac Messenger There is also a free port of MSN Messenger available on Mac called the Mac Messenger. It isn’t exactly like the Windows counterpart in terms of UI and features, but for those of you who want a similar experience, it is the best thing that comes the closest.
  • X-Chat Aqua Yes. That is X-Chat on Mac. It is an awesome IRC client for Mac. I have used it on Windows and Linux before.
  • Skype You know what Skype is. Best for voice and video chat on Mac with all your friends who don’t own a Mac–those who do, I would highly recommend the built-in Mac application iChat. Excellent stuff.
  • Colloquy This is an advanced IRC client for Mac that supports both IRC and SILC (if you’ve ever used that before).

Office Productivity

  • OpenOffice.org for Mac I needn’t say anything. It is great.
  • Microsoft Office for Mac There is also the famous Microsoft Office for Mac, but, you guessed it, it isn’t free of cost.
  • FreeMind An excellent Java-based mind mapping tool. Great for brain-storming and generally anything that requires you to create mind maps.

Browser

  • Firefox How can I not mention that? Safari, Apple’s premier browser, is great, but Firefox is greater.

Package Management
If you are migrating from a Linux background, as I am, you will find the following two tools indispensable. They are the equivalents of tools you might be in love with on Linux, such as, ‘apt-get’, ‘yum’, etc.

Development

  • XCode and Mac Dev Tools XCode is Apple’s development environment on Mac. Not merely an IDE, it constitutes the entire development tool chain, including gcc, gdb, make, etc, along with the Cocoa and Carbon frameworks and tools for development in Objective-C. Even if you don’t require the IDE or the frameworks, you may still need the development tool chain, if you ever plan to build software from source (not least your favourite open source softwares).
  • iPython If you hack often on the Python shell, it goes without saying that you MUST get iPython. You will never look back. It is an excellent wrapper over the bare Python shell, providing countless convenience features and lots of colourful eye-candy.
  • pysqlite Mac comes with the SQLite DB and client pre-installed. For the Python SQLite binding, you have to compile and install pysqlite from scratch. There may also be binary packages available.

SCM

  • Git If you want to move onto a feature-rich, robust and reliable distributed source code management system, do give Git a go.
  • Subversion (SVN) SVN comes pre-installed with Mac. For a non-distributed SCM, I’d pick SVN any day.

Right, that’s all for now. I’ll be droning on about everything Mac quite often now.

On someone’s requests, I made a five minutes un-boxing video of my Mac. I have it available in private on youtube. If you’d like to take a peek at it, please email me your YouTube account ID at ayaz -at- ayaz.pk and I’ll send you the link.