Browsing on the BlackBerry simulator


     I am not a big fan of BlackBerry smart-phones. I realize that there are a lot of people who can’t seemingly exist without access to their emails virtually all the time, and for those lot, BlackBerry, with its prominent push email feature, is perhaps a better fit than any other smart-phone platforms out there. When it comes to me and my smart-phone usage, I would not go so far as to say that I can’t live without my phone. I can. By every measure, I consider myself a hardcore geek, perhaps more hardcore than most others, but I am by no means a gadget freak. While it will be unfair to say that I absolutely abhor typing on small (semi-) keyboards, I don’t also quite enjoy the experience. When it comes down to typing, I would much rather prefer a full-fledged keyboard. That is why to me a compact laptop is many times more important than a fully equipped smart-phone. (For the curious reader, I own a Nokia E72.)

     For a recent mobile website project that I worked on, I had to face a complaint from the client where the layout of certain pages on the site didn’t look quite as expected on BlackBerry devices. Naturally, I didn’t have a BlackBerry handset nor an easy equivalent to test the issue for myself, so I did what anyone stuck in the same corner as I would do: I went over the BlackBerry developer portal online to look for BlackBerry simulators.

     Unlike the Epoch simulator for Symbian/Nokia phones and the iPhone simulator, the BlackBerry simulators were spread out such that for each possible BlackBerry smart-phone model in existence, there was a simulator available for it. And each one of the download was anywhere from 50 to 150 MB in size.

     I chose the simulator for one of the latest BlackBerry handsets, and downloaded it. Like the Epoch simulator, BlackBerry simulators are Windows-specific, in that, they are available in the form of Windows executable binaries. I didn’t have Windows anywhere in my study, so I had to set up a Windows guest inside VMware Fusion in order to set up the simulator. To cut a long, painful story short, I was able to install the simulator after tirelessly downloading a big Java SDK update, without which the installation wouldn’t continue. And then, I powered up the simulator. I was instantly reminded of the never-ending pain I had to suffer through the hands of the Epoch simulator in my previous life where I used to be a Symbian developer. The BlackBerry simulator took ages to start up. I almost cursed out loud because that fact alone opened up old, deep gashes that I had thought I had patched up for good. I was mistaken. Never in my dreams had I thought of having to deal with such monstrosity ever again. And, to my utter, absolute dismay, here I was.

     Eventually, after what seemed to have been ages since I booted up the simulator, I was able to navigate my way to the BlackBerry browser. I let out a deep sigh and thought that I could now finally concentrate on the problem I set out to tackle. But, no! I couldn’t browse on the BlackBerry browser at all. No amount of fiddling with the 3G and WiFi settings all over the BlackBerry OS got browsing working. From what I could tell, both the 3G and WiFi networks were alive, but there was no traffic flowing through. I almost gave up.

     After groping on the Internet with a wince on my face, I was finally able to find out why. Apparently, by default, the BlackBerry simulator are unable to simulate network connections. In order to do this, you have to download and install an additional, supplementary BlackBerry simulator that is called the BlackBerry MDS Simulator. Once this simulator is up and running, your actual BlackBerry simulator will be able to simulate network connections, browse, and do all sorts of network related functions. Who knew!

     As an aside, there’s also the BlackBerry Email Simulator that simulates messaging functionality.

4 thoughts on “Browsing on the BlackBerry simulator

  1. Pingback: Browsing on the BlackBerry simulator | Tea Break

  2. When I used the BlackBerry simulator I was unable to connect to internet from the build-in browser. In order to enable internet access, follow the steps below.

    BB menu -> Manage Connections -> Setup Wifi network

    The wifi wizard starts.

    Choose Next ->Manually Add Network

    Enter “Default WLAN Network” as SSID and choose Add

    Choose “No security” and pick Connect

    Pick Save (do not choose for connect, since this fails).

    Pick Next

    Done!

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